Have any of you taken math out of your sons' curriculum in high school?  Both my sons with DMD have struggled throughout the years with math and my oldest son just started 10th grade and Geometry.  The class stresses him out already and he barely made it out of Algebra last year.  The school has pushed back pretty hard when I have suggested we take math out completely as the physical fatigue, emotional drain that is high school is taking a toll on him.

They have been vehement in keeping him on the same path as everyone else.  He gets extra support but he still doesn't get it.

I don't want the next 3 years to be so stressful that he doesn't enjoy high school.  I don't know what to do.  Have any of you taken math out?

Thanks for any input.

 

Lisa Groeger

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Lisa, is your son on a track for a diploma? At our high school, the only way to get math out of the curriculum is if the student is not on seeking a diploma, but rather a certificate of achievement. Otherwise, they are mandated by law to take 3 or 4 math classes. Our school does have some remedial math that is not as difficult as geometry.
I wish you luck!!
Lori
Justin struggles with math. We wouldnt ever take him out of math, but we do have him in extra math classes. In junior high they called it double block math. Meaning we took an elective out of his schedule and put in extra math tutoring. He is starting high school this year and we have it set up to hwere he is in Taks(our state standardized tests) Incentive Math every day(our hs schedule is set up where they take 4 classes one day and 4 different ones the next day and then alternate) and he also takes an Algebra 1 class. Its ALOT of math, but in doing this for a couple of years now he has gone from failing math and the taks test to making a high B and commended performance on the Taks.
They do need Math if they are going to college or university. But, it is also a real pain for the parents, so I like the idea of tutors or what Samantha described. My son minored in Math at the University level!! I had to write up his homework pages and it took hours of not even knowing what I was doing. At least his school disability program paid volunteers($2 per class) to do their notes on carbon copy type paper and give my son a copy. We did not have a PageTurner back then so I turned back and forth, forth and back. I will never forget what a pain Math was, for both of us, and I hope you and the school can come to some "understanding". I also would like to know if anyone is going to let their unmotivated student with dmd drop out? I think it is reasonable to do for some, but for others it gives them pardon to play video games all day and tells them no one thinks they have a future. Thoughts?
Mike struggled in math and was able to receive additional help as Samantha describes. Our state requires either a Regents diploma or a cert. of acheivement as well. He did get additional help from his TA when things got particularly difficult (wink, wink). As a team, we refused to let the whole process stress him out. Homework and tests were modified occassionally to be verbal, which was easier for Mike. We were lucky as the school, teachers, TA really "got it" about what we were trying to achieve.
Andy on the other has has been too tired to handle the regular curriculum. After a bout of pneumonia as a Freshman, we switched his program to just a certificate. There was no way he was ever going to make up the work. The teachers accept whatever he turns in and grades him on just that. School for Andy is much more about growing emotionally and socially than educationally. He will be a Junior this fall. I still hold out hope that he may graduate, but tough to tell given his strength and continued decline. College is out of the question, so this route has worked well for us.
All in all, we have always found that if we just sat down with the IEP team and explained what we were dealing with and what we were trying to accomplish, they accomodated us very well. Occasionally, someone would push back and we would be forced to go higher. It has always worked.
Hi Lisa,
I have a friend with a non DMD boy who homeschooled her son only in math. He would have a study hall when the others went to math. Our son Jacob who is very bright, ie 27 on his ACT with no prep work also struggled with math esp with his last 2 years.. What did help was when our older son Ben would come home from college and would help him understand it. It is so hard it look like greek to me.

He took a class that if he scored high enough it would count for college credit because he did not want to take math in college. I wonder why the lack of dystrophin affects the ability to learn the higher leve math?

That said we moved him in Monday to his dorm and are in the process of hiring PCAs and on to a new chapter with Jacob.

Good luck! Cheri
Cheri Gunvalson said:
Hi Lisa,
I have a friend with a non DMD boy who homeschooled her son only in math. He would have a study hall when the others went to math. Our son Jacob who is very bright, ie 27 on his ACT with no prep work also struggled with math esp with his last 2 years.. What did help was when our older son Ben would come home from college and would help him understand it. It is so hard it look like greek to me.

He took a class that if he scored high enough it would count for college credit because he did not want to take math in college. I wonder why the lack of dystrophin affects the ability to learn the higher leve math?

That said we moved him in Monday to his dorm and are in the process of hiring PCAs and on to a new chapter with Jacob.

Good luck! Cheri
cheri,
great news about Jacob!. I do firmly believe that the higher level math is harder for our boys and my youngest of the three does not have DMD and doesn't struggle at all. So I think it is DMD related. He can take Geometry pass/fail and get a regular diploma and attend community college but wouldn't have the pre-reqs for a regular university. I am considering what your friend did and possibly homeschooling him in math with a tutor. He gets extra support in the classroom and a study period so I think we will wait a few more weeks to see how it goes. I just don't think the added stress in necessary however. He did fine last year in Algebra and got a B but he is already stressing out in Geometry and didn't have this stress last year. Thanks for everyone's input..
Lisa,
It is tough and I agree the stress is not worth it, it is also a very tough age. When Jacob was in 10th grade he 4.0 to D's, he became very depressed due to several issues not getting ataluen, puberty and the reality girls were not that interested in a guy in a chair. After 2 years of therapy and a antidepressant he is much better but he will tell you for him the depression was a much bigger issue than DMD.

We were able to take PE out of Jacob's 9th grade class scedule I wonder why you can't take out Math? Have you called PACER? They are a great resource and could tell you where you stand legally. Google the site...its free advice. One time I was struggleing with an issue at the school and when I told them I called PACER they changed their tune as if they were afraid of getting in trouble. They are in Mn but are very well versed in the federal statues.

More and more kids are starting out at the community colleges as the faculty student ratio is much better, ie 1/20 vs up to 400 in some of the freshman english classes. Jacob is at a branch of the U of Mn and so its a 4 yr institution but is much smaller and has much smaller classes. In the later years he has struggled with ADD and organizational issues and he would have been lost at a huge college and at this smaller school he appears to have several friends already.

Our oldest Ben who never took a book home in HS and got great grades and took all of the AP classes and is now a Sr at the U in Machanical Engineering actually turned down a free ride at a private Luthern liberal arts college to go to a community college that has a great pre engineering program where engineers teach the calc and physic's and after 2 yrs transferred to the U.

I know several DMD boys who live at home and go to a community college which appears to be much easier than living on campus, unfortunately we live 60 miles away from the closest so it was not an option.

Good Luck! Cheri

Lisa Groeger said:
cheri,
great news about Jacob!. I do firmly believe that the higher level math is harder for our boys and my youngest of the three does not have DMD and doesn't struggle at all. So I think it is DMD related. He can take Geometry pass/fail and get a regular diploma and attend community college but wouldn't have the pre-reqs for a regular university. I am considering what your friend did and possibly homeschooling him in math with a tutor. He gets extra support in the classroom and a study period so I think we will wait a few more weeks to see how it goes. I just don't think the added stress in necessary however. He did fine last year in Algebra and got a B but he is already stressing out in Geometry and didn't have this stress last year. Thanks for everyone's input..

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