If anyone has any info on this, I'd love to know.. My son, Lucas, 10 years old was diagnosed with DMD 2 years ago. He recently went on a school field trip and returned home with 3 empty water bottles in his lunch box. I 've always been aware he drinks alot, but was alittle surprised when I saw all those bottles. Since my father was diabetic, I know one of the first signs of diabetes is extreme thirst. I will have him checked with his doctor, but wondered if anyone knew of a connection between DMD and diabetes or possibly diabetes and deflazacorte. THANKS!!!! Karen   

Views: 85

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Steroids may cause diabetes. I think that is why Cincinnati team keeps checking for fasting glucose.
My son is the same way. Extreme thirst. I've had him tested on and off and no diabetes. Sure has the same symptoms. Good Luck.
So interesting - our son who is four 1/2 and newly diagnosed has always been more thirsty than our other two...and this was before he started deflazacort or before we even knew he had DMD. I seriously doubt a study has been done, but I wonder if there is a connection between DMD and thirst.
My son has always had a constant thirst...even before he was diagnosed. He has to always have a sippie cup in hand no matter whether at home or on the go. Interesting to think about....many suprises with DMD ...at least it seems that way to me...the more we learn...the more surprises.
The endocrine aspects of DMD are not well understood and have only recently been the subject of focus for DMD. Affected boys and young men use steroids and also struggle with weight gain due to inactivity which can contribute to elevated glucose levels. The body responds to higher glucose levels by flushing excess sugar through urine leading to thirst. There are also affected individuals who have been diagnosed with Type I or Type II diabetes.

It is wise to consult your son's physician if thirst seems unquenchable, especially if accompanied by fatigue, sudden weight loss or complaints of blurred vision. What is less understood is whether those affected by DMD also are more prone to Glucose Intolerance (Insulin Resistance). Prolonged periods of elevated glucose levels can affect vision and lead to other medical problems. Fasting blood tests (Not eating for 8 hours before test.) are used to diagnose glucose intolerance.

Diet can exacerbate glucose intolerance. Certain foods have a high Glycemic Index meaning they cause glucose levels to rise quickly triggering the body to produce more insulin to metabolize sugar. The sudden rise in Insulin is followed by quick digestion and soon after a sensation of being hungry despite consuming adequate calories. This can lead to weight gain and elevated glucose levels. Foods that are highly processed, white bread, white potatoes and foods containing high levels of sugar trigger this response. These foods should be avoided and replaced with whole grains, fruits and vegetables and less processed foods which take longer to digest leading a sensation of being full longer and moderate glucose levels. A balanced diet is crucial.

Speaking with a nutritionist or physician familiar with DMD and diet needs can help with planning such a diet. There are many commercial diets advertising the benefits of their plan, yet a meal plan can be developed without spending money on these programs. In a Glycemic Index diet foods are rated based on glucose with higher rated foods are avoided and lower rated foods used more frequently. I have a meal plan given to my family by a Nutritionist from Cincinnati Children's Hospital I am able to e-mail to anyone interested (brian@parentprojectmd.org).

Again, seeing your son's doctor is important when he has excessive thirst and before modifying diet to ensure appropriateness.

Brian Denger
thanks for all the info!!!!!! karen

Brian Denger said:
The endocrine aspects of DMD are not well understood and have only recently been the subject of focus for DMD. Affected boys and young men use steroids and also struggle with weight gain due to inactivity which can contribute to elevated glucose levels. The body responds to higher glucose levels by flushing excess sugar through urine leading to thirst. There are also affected individuals who have been diagnosed with Type I or Type II diabetes.

It is wise to consult your son's physician if thirst seems unquenchable, especially if accompanied by fatigue, sudden weight loss or complaints of blurred vision. What is less understood is whether those affected by DMD also are more prone to Glucose Intolerance (Insulin Resistance). Prolonged periods of elevated glucose levels can affect vision and lead to other medical problems. Fasting blood tests (Not eating for 8 hours before test.) are used to diagnose glucose intolerance.

Diet can exacerbate glucose intolerance. Certain foods have a high Glycemic Index meaning they cause glucose levels to rise quickly triggering the body to produce more insulin to metabolize sugar. The sudden rise in Insulin is followed by quick digestion and soon after a sensation of being hungry despite consuming adequate calories. This can lead to weight gain and elevated glucose levels. Foods that are highly processed, white bread, white potatoes and foods containing high levels of sugar trigger this response. These foods should be avoided and replaced with whole grains, fruits and vegetables and less processed foods which take longer to digest leading a sensation of being full longer and moderate glucose levels. A balanced diet is crucial.

Speaking with a nutritionist or physician familiar with DMD and diet needs can help with planning such a diet. There are many commercial diets advertising the benefits of their plan, yet a meal plan can be developed without spending money on these programs. In a Glycemic Index diet foods are rated based on glucose with higher rated foods are avoided and lower rated foods used more frequently. I have a meal plan given to my family by a Nutritionist from Cincinnati Children's Hospital I am able to e-mail to anyone interested (brian@parentprojectmd.org).

Again, seeing your son's doctor is important when he has excessive thirst and before modifying diet to ensure appropriateness.

Brian Denger

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need help using this community site? Visit Ning's Help Page.

Members

Events

© 2019   Created by PPMD.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service