My son will be starting kindergarden in the fall.  He has been in the preschool program for almost 3 years.  What sort of things do I need to address in his IEP this spring?  He does not write well, but can keep up with his peers physically for the most part.  His teachers say he is right where he should be according to their standards. 

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Hi Aimee

How your son is doing determines the IEP. Remember you can call a second or third meeting as needs arise. I liked having the classroom teacher get to know my son for a month-6weeks so he/she can contribute from a place of experience. I do suggest that you meet with the teacher before school starts so that you can give her a heads up about your child's condition, bring something in written form so that it can referred to later. Better in the fall because they forget over the summer. Some specifics I would put in from the beginning are: have an emergency evacuation plan in place (this is a potential time for falling and getting hurt) he probably needs a designated aid/teacher to make sure he is safe. If they have PE make sure there aren't too many repetions of anything. Long running isn't helpful. If there is a separate PE teacher or music teacher they need to be educated on the disease. Lastly I would ask for PT services and have him tested for OT or speech if needed to see if he quailifies. Actually, this testing could occur during the week or 2 before school starts so that he isn't removed from class. I requested that testing and therapy occurred before or after school so that Erik didn't lose class time and made to feel even more different. Best wishes. I know that it will work out fine, just maintain good relations with the school and they will do their very best for your son.
Thanks for the info!

Karen said:
Hi Aimee

How your son is doing determines the IEP. Remember you can call a second or third meeting as needs arise. I liked having the classroom teacher get to know my son for a month-6weeks so he/she can contribute from a place of experience. I do suggest that you meet with the teacher before school starts so that you can give her a heads up about your child's condition, bring something in written form so that it can referred to later. Better in the fall because they forget over the summer. Some specifics I would put in from the beginning are: have an emergency evacuation plan in place (this is a potential time for falling and getting hurt) he probably needs a designated aid/teacher to make sure he is safe. If they have PE make sure there aren't too many repetions of anything. Long running isn't helpful. If there is a separate PE teacher or music teacher they need to be educated on the disease. Lastly I would ask for PT services and have him tested for OT or speech if needed to see if he quailifies. Actually, this testing could occur during the week or 2 before school starts so that he isn't removed from class. I requested that testing and therapy occurred before or after school so that Erik didn't lose class time and made to feel even more different. Best wishes. I know that it will work out fine, just maintain good relations with the school and they will do their very best for your son.
Hi,

I gave all Jon's teachers whatever articles I could find. The MDA has a booklet for teachers and kidshealth.org has articles for adults and children that are pretty helpful to introduce the topic. My son was 9 when he was diagnosed so I don't have any advice for kindergarten.

Susan
We just our Connor's IEP for Kindergarten done. It was early because his pre-school teacher was moving out of state. Connor primary issue right now is writing - his grasp is weak. Otherwise, here's what we asked for or suggested to us:

* a chair to sit in for circle time, rather than forcing him to get up and down off the floor.
* a special kids keyboard/computer thing (name escapes me) to introduce him to typing skills in the classroom (already doing this at home with home computer)
* Extra time at lunch because he has always been a slow and messy eater. No kidding....he always takes 30-45 minutes, sometimes longer.
* Extra time for any timed academic/athletic activities - yes, there can be some in Kindergarten
* Plenty of access to rest time during recess or other playground activities.
* Lots of opportunity for milk/yogurt (for calcium intake)
* Usage of a wheelchair (Connor has his own chair - Convaid adaptive stroller provided to us by Kids Mobility Network) for all emergencies or fire drills.
* Health Plan - outline steroids side effects, malignant hyperthermia susceptibility, any other specific issue to your child

It's not a lot of substance as the IEP's will require later on, but lays a pretty good foundation.

Good Luck!
Thanks. Liam has the same issues. How did your son feel about the stroller? I don't think Liam will be too happy about it. He won't ride in a stroller now even at the zoo and amusement parks (my husband or dad put him on their shoulders when he gets tired).

Liisa Underwood said:
We just our Connor's IEP for Kindergarten done. It was early because his pre-school teacher was moving out of state. Connor primary issue right now is writing - his grasp is weak. Otherwise, here's what we asked for or suggested to us:

* a chair to sit in for circle time, rather than forcing him to get up and down off the floor.
* a special kids keyboard/computer thing (name escapes me) to introduce him to typing skills in the classroom (already doing this at home with home computer)
* Extra time at lunch because he has always been a slow and messy eater. No kidding....he always takes 30-45 minutes, sometimes longer.
* Extra time for any timed academic/athletic activities - yes, there can be some in Kindergarten
* Plenty of access to rest time during recess or other playground activities.
* Lots of opportunity for milk/yogurt (for calcium intake)
* Usage of a wheelchair (Connor has his own chair - Convaid adaptive stroller provided to us by Kids Mobility Network) for all emergencies or fire drills.
* Health Plan - outline steroids side effects, malignant hyperthermia susceptibility, any other specific issue to your child

It's not a lot of substance as the IEP's will require later on, but lays a pretty good foundation.

Good Luck!
I simply cannot carry him anymore. If my hubby isn't with us, then I have to have a stroller and tell him that is the way it goes. I let him walk whenever he insists, but if he insists on being carried I tell him he has to go into the stroller.

The only time I see him really fuss about it the stroller is getting on and off the school bus. He wants to climb like his friends. Don't blame him. However, the school district bus system has a rule that they are not allowed to pick up the children, just help them up the stairs and onto the seat. So we had to decide one way or the other and we chose the stroller with the bus chair lift.

Aimee Ealy said:
Thanks. Liam has the same issues. How did your son feel about the stroller? I don't think Liam will be too happy about it. He won't ride in a stroller now even at the zoo and amusement parks (my husband or dad put him on their shoulders when he gets tired).
Liisa Underwood said:
We just our Connor's IEP for Kindergarten done. It was early because his pre-school teacher was moving out of state. Connor primary issue right now is writing - his grasp is weak. Otherwise, here's what we asked for or suggested to us:

* a chair to sit in for circle time, rather than forcing him to get up and down off the floor.
* a special kids keyboard/computer thing (name escapes me) to introduce him to typing skills in the classroom (already doing this at home with home computer)
* Extra time at lunch because he has always been a slow and messy eater. No kidding....he always takes 30-45 minutes, sometimes longer.
* Extra time for any timed academic/athletic activities - yes, there can be some in Kindergarten
* Plenty of access to rest time during recess or other playground activities.
* Lots of opportunity for milk/yogurt (for calcium intake)
* Usage of a wheelchair (Connor has his own chair - Convaid adaptive stroller provided to us by Kids Mobility Network) for all emergencies or fire drills.
* Health Plan - outline steroids side effects, malignant hyperthermia susceptibility, any other specific issue to your child

It's not a lot of substance as the IEP's will require later on, but lays a pretty good foundation.

Good Luck!
Liam is still able to climb the bus stairs, but you are right about carrying them! He is a solid, compact 40 lbs.
Good idea about the stroller for emergency drills. Maybe he will be okay with a wagon. Did your school provide that?
What kind of keyboard and mouse do you have? He does okay with our laptop, but I think he would do better with a keyboard and mouse. Do you use any type of pencil grip?
Liisa Underwood said:
I simply cannot carry him anymore. If my hubby isn't with us, then I have to have a stroller and tell him that is the way it goes. I let him walk whenever he insists, but if he insists on being carried I tell him he has to go into the stroller.

The only time I see him really fuss about it the stroller is getting on and off the school bus. He wants to climb like his friends. Don't blame him. However, the school district bus system has a rule that they are not allowed to pick up the children, just help them up the stairs and onto the seat. So we had to decide one way or the other and we chose the stroller with the bus chair lift.

Aimee Ealy said:
Thanks. Liam has the same issues. How did your son feel about the stroller? I don't think Liam will be too happy about it. He won't ride in a stroller now even at the zoo and amusement parks (my husband or dad put him on their shoulders when he gets tired).
Liisa Underwood said:
We just our Connor's IEP for Kindergarten done. It was early because his pre-school teacher was moving out of state. Connor primary issue right now is writing - his grasp is weak. Otherwise, here's what we asked for or suggested to us:

* a chair to sit in for circle time, rather than forcing him to get up and down off the floor.
* a special kids keyboard/computer thing (name escapes me) to introduce him to typing skills in the classroom (already doing this at home with home computer)
* Extra time at lunch because he has always been a slow and messy eater. No kidding....he always takes 30-45 minutes, sometimes longer.
* Extra time for any timed academic/athletic activities - yes, there can be some in Kindergarten
* Plenty of access to rest time during recess or other playground activities.
* Lots of opportunity for milk/yogurt (for calcium intake)
* Usage of a wheelchair (Connor has his own chair - Convaid adaptive stroller provided to us by Kids Mobility Network) for all emergencies or fire drills.
* Health Plan - outline steroids side effects, malignant hyperthermia susceptibility, any other specific issue to your child

It's not a lot of substance as the IEP's will require later on, but lays a pretty good foundation.

Good Luck!
We provided the Convaid Stroller, so we just send it to school every day he goes. The insurance denied paying for it, so we went to Kids Mobility Network who refurbishes previously owned equipment. All we had to do was provide a $200 donation and the insurance paperwork that indicated they denied it. They usually deny it because it's not technically a wheelchair. The Convaid will last him until he is 100 lbs I think. This is good!!! www.kidsmobility.org

So far we are using a regular keyboard and mouse. Eventually, I'll get the easier one. Still need to investigate this one.

I ask them to use markers and not a pencil because it takes too much work for him to press down hard enough. He's already shown that he is less likely to do the work with pencil. So using markers is his primary tool for writing.



Aimee Ealy said:
Liam is still able to climb the bus stairs, but you are right about carrying them! He is a solid, compact 40 lbs.
Good idea about the stroller for emergency drills. Maybe he will be okay with a wagon. Did your school provide that?
What kind of keyboard and mouse do you have? He does okay with our laptop, but I think he would do better with a keyboard and mouse. Do you use any type of pencil grip?
Liisa Underwood said:
I simply cannot carry him anymore. If my hubby isn't with us, then I have to have a stroller and tell him that is the way it goes. I let him walk whenever he insists, but if he insists on being carried I tell him he has to go into the stroller.

The only time I see him really fuss about it the stroller is getting on and off the school bus. He wants to climb like his friends. Don't blame him. However, the school district bus system has a rule that they are not allowed to pick up the children, just help them up the stairs and onto the seat. So we had to decide one way or the other and we chose the stroller with the bus chair lift.

Aimee Ealy said:
Thanks. Liam has the same issues. How did your son feel about the stroller? I don't think Liam will be too happy about it. He won't ride in a stroller now even at the zoo and amusement parks (my husband or dad put him on their shoulders when he gets tired).
Liisa Underwood said:
We just our Connor's IEP for Kindergarten done. It was early because his pre-school teacher was moving out of state. Connor primary issue right now is writing - his grasp is weak. Otherwise, here's what we asked for or suggested to us:

* a chair to sit in for circle time, rather than forcing him to get up and down off the floor.
* a special kids keyboard/computer thing (name escapes me) to introduce him to typing skills in the classroom (already doing this at home with home computer)
* Extra time at lunch because he has always been a slow and messy eater. No kidding....he always takes 30-45 minutes, sometimes longer.
* Extra time for any timed academic/athletic activities - yes, there can be some in Kindergarten
* Plenty of access to rest time during recess or other playground activities.
* Lots of opportunity for milk/yogurt (for calcium intake)
* Usage of a wheelchair (Connor has his own chair - Convaid adaptive stroller provided to us by Kids Mobility Network) for all emergencies or fire drills.
* Health Plan - outline steroids side effects, malignant hyperthermia susceptibility, any other specific issue to your child

It's not a lot of substance as the IEP's will require later on, but lays a pretty good foundation.

Good Luck!

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