My son Kevin is almost 7. He is in a self contained special ed. 2nd grade class. He knows the letters and almost all of their sounds but has not yet learned to read. I am a first grade teacher so I know how to teach other children how to read. I am having difficulty teaching Kevin. Last year first grade was horrible. This year I want to be as pro-active as I can. If you have any advice, info, etc. that I could pass on to his teacher I would greatly appreciate it!!! Thank you!!

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My son has started grade one and initially had difficulty with letter sounds in Kindergarten. By the end of the year, he was able to learn some of his "sight" words (short words that are memorized rather than sounded out phonetically). I gave his teacher a copy of the following publication from Parent Project UK http://www.ppuk.org/library/Education/Toolkit%20Final.pdf. On page 13 it states that "Up to 40% of boys with DMD may have dyslexia, with associated problems in phonological processing". Section 4.2 has some ideas to try at home to help "decode" the words. Evan is on a waiting list to be tested for dyslexia so that he might receive extra assistance with his reading. Perhaps there is a similar program in your school.
Joshua is in grade 1 now and is behind in that area as well. I talk with the school quite often and told them that many with this disease are behind in this area quite often. What happens with many though is that they are behind for the first couple years and after that it's amazing quite often that by the time they get to grade 3 many are fine and at the same level as others. They seem to be behind at first then out of blue, the next year they tend to be at the same level as all the other children. It just seems to many that they are 'behind', but the way they learn is just different from others. What they do with Joshua then though is keep him in the regular classes and since he's already done pre-school and kindergarten, they have already seen a difference in grade 1. I was able to keep him in regular classes though because I explained this to them. They are surprised though seeing the difference so far this year. Keeping open communication with the school is what made the difference though.

Naomi
My son is also 7, in 2nd grade. He gets sped help with reading, writing and math. But recently has made leaps and bounds since finishing first grade. He reads to me now! I had your concerns as well and made a similiar post quite a while ago. At that time, James Poysky sent me a copy of his work titled Learning and Behavior in Duchenne Muscular Dystophy. I found it very helpful. Try reaching out to James here and see if he can send a copy of it to you.
Hope that helps!
Cindyq
The experts say that around 8y/o, the reading issue resolves. my son was held back in Pre-K and was 7 in March of Kindergarten. This year, 1st grade all of a sudden it all clicked and he can read too! He is so proud of himself. Keep plugging away...I bet it will come!

cindy q said:
My son is also 7, in 2nd grade. He gets sped help with reading, writing and math. But recently has made leaps and bounds since finishing first grade. He reads to me now! I had your concerns as well and made a similiar post quite a while ago. At that time, James Poysky sent me a copy of his work titled Learning and Behavior in Duchenne Muscular Dystophy. I found it very helpful. Try reaching out to James here and see if he can send a copy of it to you.
Hope that helps!
Cindyq
My son is in 6th grade and is still struggling with reading and math. I am wondering if it will ever click. He can read the words he knows very well. the ones he doesn't , he just can't decode them.
I found a link to James Poysky's Learning & Behavior publication at http://ladymdesigns.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=feature.display&fe.... I sent it to Evan's resource teacher and she said it would be very helpful.
Hi Everyone! Sorry about the long delay in getting the behavior and learning guide wrapped up and published. I tend to run about a year or two behind on all my projects. Send me an email (jamespoysky@gmail.com) and I'll send you a "proof" copy for now. The goal is to get it edited and formatted by the end of the year.

Regarding reading, I'm not sure who people are refering to when they say that kids get better at reading by the 3rd grade. Its not tru. Dyslexia doesn't just "go away". It may get somewhat better over time, but that progress is far behind where they should be and seems to be limited to word recognition. They continue to have major problems with reading fluency (accuracy and efficiency when reading longer passages), and their reading is more slow and more effortful for them than for others. Don't skimp on the reading intervention. Hit it hard, cause the brain starts to become hard-wired by the time you're about 9 or 10 years of age, making progress more difficult. Check out Jack Flether's books about correcting dyslexia. You have to do some heavy and intensive and repetitive phonics instruction.
My son's hasn't. I see no big leap forward and catching up that everyone is talking about that is supposed to occur around 8 & 9 yrs old.

James Poysky said:
Hi Everyone! Sorry about the long delay in getting the behavior and learning guide wrapped up and published. I tend to run about a year or two behind on all my projects. Send me an email (jamespoysky@gmail.com) and I'll send you a "proof" copy for now. The goal is to get it edited and formatted by the end of the year.

Regarding reading, I'm not sure who people are refering to when they say that kids get better at reading by the 3rd grade. Its not tru. Dyslexia doesn't just "go away". It may get somewhat better over time, but that progress is far behind where they should be and seems to be limited to word recognition. They continue to have major problems with reading fluency (accuracy and efficiency when reading longer passages), and their reading is more slow and more effortful for them than for others. Don't skimp on the reading intervention. Hit it hard, cause the brain starts to become hard-wired by the time you're about 9 or 10 years of age, making progress more difficult. Check out Jack Flether's books about correcting dyslexia. You have to do some heavy and intensive and repetitive phonics instruction.

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