Hi, again! How high would you put a wall mounted sink? Our son is not yet in a wheelchair, so I'm in the dark on this one. Some time ago, I asked how tall would a table need to be. Some of you responded with the answer of counter top height (36 in). I'm guessing this would be the same. I'd love your insight and experience with this kind of sink.
Thanks

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Our sink is 31in to the bottom. We measured ours specifically to Justins chair. He has a larger chair. He slides right underneath it. We also used a taller faucet and larger handles that make it easier to reach

--Samantha
Hi Danelle,

It's been awhile since interior design classes but there are a couple of things I remember. I wouldn't install a handicapped sink at 36" off finished floor (o.f.f.) because that is the standard kitchen counter height for practically every adult in usa, even the extremely tall & short ones. Since the DMD condition changes, our son's chairs and accessability needs will change too. I would consider adding as much flexiblity as possible. There are sinks with counters that actually move up and down the wall to accomodate height changes. Probably an expensive thingy though. Consider going lower on the fixed counter height, say in the range of elbow height of your son in his current chair/scooter - 3"-5" either way give or take. You can also add flexibility at the faucet by changing the standard bathroom one to a kitchen type with lever handles (not the turning kind), sprayer/hose. It should provide more reach. Also, measure your son's scooter/chair (I assume he has one?) from the "nose" or furthest point at the front wheels to his elbows while seated. This will help you determine how deep to make your counter, standard is 24" deep but handicapped residential installations typically are made to fit. He should have clear space underneath the counter (no lower cabinets) to roll in and not bump into anything. Try to make sure there is a turning radius of min 36" diameter, this should be larger if you can do it. That way he can get in and back out of his sink/tub/toilet areas. Light switches should be lower, anywhere from 36"-42" o.f.f., outlets should be higher than the standard 12" o.f.f. for easy reach.

Samantha's sounds like it works really well!
hope this helps,
cheryl
We use a kitchen faucet and handles in the bathroom. It makes things so much easier for Justin. We also took out all but one small corner cabinet. When Justin is at the sink, his toothbrush sits right within reach on that one counter. My other two kids have room on the counter also. We put a larger over the toilet cabinet to hold the things that my girls needed because they can get to it. Also, if you are putting in a new higher toilet, make sure you have enough room to install rails around it for the boys to hold onto!! We have rails that attach to the toilet and go down to the floor. It makes Justin feel so much more secure when using the toilet.

--Samantha
Love the kitchen faucet idea! Samantha, can you describe the rails around the toilet a little more? How/where do they attach to the toilet? Also, I wasn't planning on much in the way of handrails anywhere else. Is that a mistake? I guess I was thinking that he won't have the upper body strength to pull himself up anyway. Anyone/everyone, feel free to chime in! Thanks!
Hi Danielle,

Handicapped rails are typical in bathrooms, I recommend them. You can find out where to put them by looking at task areas (sink, toilet, shower, tub) where either you or your son might need to hold onto something in order to transfer (like to toilet or tub) or where one might need to grab a support, to balance, in the event of slipping (shower). In fact we need some in our son's bathroom and have yet to get to it :(. They are sold anywhere, HomeD, bathroom suppliers, and can easily be installed over tile or bolted into walls, plumbers should know.
send pics so we can see,
cheryl

Danelle Dickerson said:
Love the kitchen faucet idea! Samantha, can you describe the rails around the toilet a little more? How/where do they attach to the toilet? Also, I wasn't planning on much in the way of handrails anywhere else. Is that a mistake? I guess I was thinking that he won't have the upper body strength to pull himself up anyway. Anyone/everyone, feel free to chime in! Thanks!
I will take some pics of our bathroom here in a bit and post them. Rails are a good idea even when your child is walking. When they start getting unsteady it provides them stability and support.

--Samantha
Its a small bathroom but we couldnt afford to add on and no room to expand
Attachments:
Let me know if you cant get these pics and send me your email and I will email them to you. I do not know how to resize pics!! I meant to add that Justin has no problems getting into and out of our bathroom.

--Samantha
Samantha, thank you for taking the time to add the pictures. It really helped me to visualize. Also, just to clarify, your sink is 31 in. from the floor to under the sink basin . . . not 31 in. from the floor to the top of the sink? Thanks!
Danelle
31in from the floor to the bottom of the sink.
You might find an abundance of useful information here: http://www.design.ncsu.edu/cud
Thanks, Paul, I'll check it out. I know that ADA requirements are helpful, but some of them seem to apply more to manual wheelchairs than to powerchairs (which are taller). It's challenging to know what to go by - especially because our son isn't in any chair yet. We're trying to project future needs.

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