http://www.biosciencetechnology.com/News/Feeds/2010/12/products-che...

Any comments on this? Not sure whether to laugh or cry. Would appreciate any insights. Does this mean there's no therapy if our boys are over 3 years old?

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Personally I am very grateful to Stanford Univ for announcing DMD as a "stem cell disease".  It doesn't matter to me if I, or even Lee Sweeney, agrees with all or part of that announcement.  Stanford U is well respected and heavily funded by the state of Cal specifically for stem cell research and regenerative medicine.  If their announcement provides more money for research who cares what they said? 

 

If all or part of DMD has something to do with stem cells, or if the chance for an upcoming treatment or curative strategy comes about from this announcement, and subsequent funding,  I'll be eternally grateful to Stanford U and their conclusions.    Or even if this announcement simply helps get the word out, how can that be bad? 

 

Hate to be Pollyanna...but in my eyes this is ALL GOOD.

Interesting research results that suggest it may be possible to make old muscle stem cells more active.  It's too early to say whether this might be exploited for DMD treatments.

 

http://blogs.nature.com/news/thegreatbeyond/2010/12/reversing_aging...

Im all for advocating about DMD, but misinterpreted information can be harmful, hence the OP's question in the first place.

 

Yes, DMD infomation/data is easily misinterpreted by the best advocates and experts.   This is a very difficult disease.  What I see from Stanford's article isn't misintrepretation as much a difference in opinion between Stanford U and Lee Sweeney, both well respected.   Personally it doesn't matter so much to me if experts disagree, no harm done.   It's wonderful we a) have experts looking into DMD and b) there is enough funding to have multiple experts discussing DMD, and yes disagreeing. 

 

If Stanford U wants DMD to be a stem cell disease, it's fine with me.   Its actually grand because they have potential to obtain billions from the state of California from that statement to further their study of DMD.   This is, in my humble opinion goes beyond advocacy. 

 

Does any of this mean our sons are doomed?  Only God knows and I'd bet Stanford U and Lee Sweeney would agree on that. 

Jonathan said:

Im all for advocating about DMD, but misinterpreted information can be harmful, hence the OP's question in the first place.

 

Thanks Jon, that was a nice article.  The mouse pic actually looked like the creature was smiling!  So cute.  Sure wish we could see some progress with this approach. 

Jon Moulton said:

Interesting research results that suggest it may be possible to make old muscle stem cells more active.  It's too early to say whether this might be exploited for DMD treatments.

 

http://blogs.nature.com/news/thegreatbeyond/2010/12/reversing_aging...

Pat's latest blog discusses this paper.

Seems ridiculous to be argueing which is right...

 

One could get a large cut and wrap it in bandages to stop the bleeding so one does not bleed to death. Applying pressure using bandages may stop bleeding temporarily and when you run out of bandages the bleeding continues and the patient may bleed to death. Can bandages be instigated in the persons death ? Hardly.

 

However if the patient can wear a bandage each day and change it when needed and survive, until the wound heals itself or not, then they are  lot better off. In any case, can the boys own stem cells not be farmed in culture and then given back to them over time ? Why can't these non differentiated cells be used for continuous treatment...is it a cost or technological issue ? Why even rely on the boys own internal source of production if we can mass produce and re-inject... Perhaps there a distribution issue ?

 

 

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