My daughter and I were wondering what other parents tend to do when it comes to sweets. On a daily basis my daughter and her husband limit sweets and try to keep the boys on a healthy diet, but when they are at a party where other children are eating cake or cookies, they allow them to have it also. I'd like to hear input from other parents as to whether or not they allow any sweets in their children's diets. Other than the obvious weight gain, does sugar pose any extra threat to our boys than they would to a child without DMD?

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just rots their teeth...I have two who love candy...i'd be interested to know as well...i let them eat as much as they want...maybe not as much as they want...but a good bit..
We try to run a balance between making it the "forbiden fruit" and an everyday thing . . . . I have to say it is a little tricky! Jack gets more than I would like him to, but then again I eat more than I should too. At Halloween I let him have a couple pieces the day of, then one a day until he stops asking and then I through it out or send it to work with my husband. He actually forgets about it quite quickly (3-5 days), because we don't make an issue of it.

Ang :)
Hello Terry,

This has been an occasional topic in our home as both my sons have DMD and my daughter has Type I Diabetes. I think Angela has said what my wife and I discovered to be the best approach for our family...balance. If a big deal is made of restricting sweets and enforcing "healthy foods" it can manifest into a larger problem. We don't buy soft drinks and limit fruit juice (Read the labels on fruit juices to see how much sugar they contain!) or candy, yet now and then we let the boys have a root beer with their meal, eat some of their Halloween candy and never say no to cake at a birthday. After my sons have had what they like from Halloween or other holiday candy we usually wind up throwing a lot out as they've had their fill. I think not ranting about how "bad" sweets are and just not having so much around makes it less likely any child will crave them so much. Good habits are as easy to learn as bad and after a while the boys learn to self limit. Other things we like include is real fruit as a snack, yet not always a replacement for things like real home made goodies. To those who do eat a lot of sweets brushing teeth afterward is extra important.

Brian Denger
This year when I took my son to the dentist, they put protective sealent on his teeth so that food does not get stuck there and cause cavities. They even use it on baby teeth. Just thought, I will mention..
not for sure on this, but check for hardening calves, especially during halloween....and possibly with younger children.

i have heard from other parents that during the week following halloween, that they have noticed their sons having harder calves, possibly from all the sweets eaten at this time.

again, i am not sure on this...could just be a coincidence....
this must be a coincidence; it doesn't make any sense. As with other kids, make sure they get lots of good food, and that you eat well, too! I would never forbid candy. I think that's a giant mistake. Just be sure it doesn't substitute for a delicious, healthy food.

MicahsDaddy said:
not for sure on this, but check for hardening calves, especially during halloween....and possibly with younger children.

i have heard from other parents that during the week following halloween, that they have noticed their sons having harder calves, possibly from all the sweets eaten at this time.

again, i am not sure on this...could just be a coincidence....
I thank everyone for their replies. It seems like most families are in agreement that a healthy balance is the right way to go. Terry

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